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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
rolls to re-election and a second term, defeating mitt romney despite a weak u.s. economy and persistently high unemployment. >> investors cheer obama's re-election. equities trading high led by autos and health care stocks. >> democrats keep their hold of the senate and republicans keep their control of the house. >> there will be a tough challenge facing the looming fiscal cliff. >>> a very good morning to you. it's been a long night, but we have a result. >> yes, we do. let's get right it to. president barack obama capturing a second term in the white house despite the struggling u.s. economy. he did manage to win many of the same states he took in 2008 and nearly all the critical swing states, including ohio, virginia, and colorado. speaking to supporters in chicago just a few hours ago, the president congratulated his republican challenger on the spirited race and said there's plenty of work ahead to fix the country's fiscal problems. >> i believe we can seize this future together, because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. we're not as cynical as the pund
, and i think we think it's more likely than not that democrats will gain seats in the u.s. senate. that was unthinkable six months ago. it's going to lead to real recriminations inside the republican party about who made these mistakes and getting these candidates and failing to get people like todd akin out of these races and get electable republicans into these races that they have to be able to win. >> if you look at senate republicans other the last four cycles, they've been pummeled. in 2006 democrats weren't supposed to pick up the senate, they did. in 2008 they expanded to a 60-seat majority, they were able to get health care done as a result of the pickup that they had. in 2010 you had republicans have an opportunity to pick up the senate, they fell short. and now again a huge opportunity this year to pick up the senate, and it looks like they might actually fall backwards because of these races you're talking about, massachusetts, indiana and missouri. i think one of the things that we've learned over the last couple of cycles is when republicans talk about the economy as
and save the u.s. economy from going down a dangerous road. it is wednesday, november 7th, the day after and a special early presentation of "squawk box" follows the late presentation that we had yesterday. but it starts right now. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. and yes, we know it's only 5:00 a.m. on the east coast, but you don't have to double check your clocks. on the morning after election day, we couldn't wait until 6:00 a.m. to get back on the air. the american public handing president obama four more years in the white house. meantime, the balance of power stays the same in the senate. this morning, we have two main items on the squawk agenda. after months of handicapping the race, we'll find out how the global markets react to the decision and ask how you need to position your portfolio. we have a number of people on hand to help us with that task, including mike santoli. he is our guest the next hour. chuck gabriel, his job is to try to connect the dots between washington and investors. we have jeremy seigel. also, vincent rinehart. we'll be jo
of maryland, and along with that the first openly gay member of the u.s. senate was elected in wisconsin. here is tammy baldwin. [video clip] >> i did not run to make history. i ran to make a difference. [applause] a difference in the lives of families struggling to find work and pay the bills, a difference in the lives of students worried about debt. [applause] and seniors, worried about their retirement security. [applause] a difference in the lives of veterans who fought for us and need someone fighting for them and their families. [applause] a difference in the lives of entrepreneur weres -- entrepreneurs try to build a business and economic security. [applause] but in choosing me to tackle those challenges, the people of wisconsin have made history. [applause] host: this tweet from benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel, who congratulates u.s. president barack obama on his election victory. fort lauderdale, florida. independent line. caller: thank you for taking my call. host: did you vote yesterday or early in florida? caller: a voted early. actually, i went out and did some la
to call at this point. derrick. >>> thank you anita. we have a winner in the virginia u.s. senate race. democrat tim kaine defeats george allen. now, andrea ma karen is with the -- andrea ma karen is with -- mac karen is with them. and sadie is with the democratic party. >> reporter: yeah. people were cautious coming in. it took a while to develop. tim kaine is finishing up his victor speech. there he goes. thanking everybody. i don't know if you can hear me. but the crowd is very excited. tim kaine hugging congressman bobby scott right there. and to the far right i'm not sure if you can see him, but it is his father-in-law. obviously even very excited -- everybody excited. it was a hard fought, tight race. $80 million. the most expensive senate race this year. lots of negative ads. 50 million of that money came from outside sources. and governor kaine said they fought against the negative advertisements. everybody very excited. tim kaine talked a little about his missionary work. he took a year off from college and went and lived in honduras where he went to missionary for a year. tal
of the national senatorial committee made a statement this morning regarding last night. u.s. senator john cornyn tonight made the following statement. here is the "new york times" and how they played last night's election. here is the, "wall street journal." the "washington times." andy "washington post" -- and the "washington post." cynthia on the democrat's line, good morning. caller: my view is how to do with the racism. there is a much divisiveness in terms of the racism. in order for both parties to move ahead, i think that's something needs to be done there. there is racism, and the other topic was how women were huge, especially by the republicans. women are people prepared -- our people. god gave us all the power to think on our own and there is nowhere that he says women cannot make choices. and men, especially on the republican side, are going to have to realize that women should be able to say what we allow with our bodies and not allow. host: can you give us an example of what you mean by racism in yesterday's election? caller: racism in terms of black and white, hispanic -- host: yo
: astonishment. i mean, they were amazed that most u.s. states don't require voter id. they were confused about why there's no uniform system that each state kind of does its own thing, and they were puzzled by provisional ballots. that's where you walk in, and if your name's not on the voter rolls, you still have eligibility to vote, and then they check your status later on, if ever. they also commented on the lack of police presence at polling places, and they wondered how it is we keep people from sending in numerous ballots when you have mail-in ballots, and many, of course, have wondered the same thing. keep in mind, many of these observers come from countries where you give a thumb print to actually prove that you're a voters, you know, fingerprinted. and in gambia, megyn, they give you one marble, and you take that marble, and you put it in the jar that has your candidate's name on it, and they listen for that ding, right? because if they get more than one ding, they think maybe there's a little bit of -- megyn: funny business. >> reporter: you know, a little bit of -- megyn: hanky-panky
's first openly gay u.s. senator, defeating tommy thompson. >> and the key word there, "openly." and in maine, independent angus king easily won the senate seat. i am not bottled up on that one. >> the most important adverb of the morning. >> the most notable pickup for republicans was in nebraska where deb fischer flipped ben nelson's seat defeating bob kerrey. >> look at these numbers, mike, really quickly before we go to break. that race was getting close, we had heard, near the end. kerrey was catching up. but i'll tell you what, in all of these races, barack obama's coattails were long. in nebraska, you look at those numbers, you look at massachusetts, it wasn't even close in the end. mitt romney had no coattails. in fact, he had a really detrimental impact on a lot of these candidates. >> mitt romney lost in every state he's ever liver lived. >> that's a bad sign. >> do you think his dog's going to even look at him today? >> you know the guy who's in charge of the research committee for republican senate candidates? >> well, no, i don't, thank god. i mean, seriously. the
old, i just became a u.s. citizen this year and must say i was so proud to have the privilege to vote. i started crying as i was walking away from the polls. just whoever whelmed with emotions. #voteordie. and speaking of the youth vote, despite the fact that unemployment for those between 18 and 29 was up 12% in the month of october, by 61% of young voters still favor president obama. there was some concern about an enthusiasm gap because in 2008, 78% of young people said they were very enthusiastic about the president but only 48% said so this time around. so it will be very interesting to see if they actually turned out. >> actually go and vote. >> right. >> that is the big question. they turned out at about the same rate as those four years ago. josh elliott. you have people gathering around. >> the anticipation is starting to build, people milling about and seeing on the giant screen surrounding us here in times square turning it into a virtual amphitheater. the votes coming in. as we project states, the excitement starting to build and i want to bring in first-time voters. we ar
the battleground states that were so heavily fought over in the most expensive race in u.s. history. it was early this morning when the president appeared with his family, becoming the third consecutive two-term president we elected. not happening since the presidents jefferson, madison and monroe. president obama won both a decisive victory in both the electoral college. and here on the east, the nor'easter, a storm so fierce the governor of new jersey said it will move the state's recovery effort backward for a time. and here is a look at the skating rink we used as part of the coverage on election night. tonight, it is under a layer of swirling snow. back inside, we begin with what happened last night. the president's historic re-election to a second term. he is back on his way to the white house tonight, where kristen welker starts off the coverage. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian, after the grueling election, the president returns back to the white house. and with the economy limping back to health, the stakes could not be higher. the president headed back to washington where
immigrants permission to work if they were brought to the u.s. as children. right now as it stands, do you believe there are enough republicans who belief in compromise on immigration? >> well, i want to believe that we believe. >> reporter: do you believe it right now? >> yes, because if i don't believe it i wouldn't be able to be a republican. >> reporter: in florida, colorado, and nevada, the percentage of the electorate that is hispanic has increased one percentage point or more in the last four years. by 2016, at least two million more latinos will be eligible to vote. the obama campaign went out of its way to reach hispanics, airing this add in key markets. (president obama speaking spanish) it's that sensitivity that they say was missing from the romney campaign. >> we just want to be taken seriously. today we showed that them that -- we demanded at the ballot box -- they can't ignore us. we're here, we're voting, we're paying attention. >> reporter: to get a sense of the numbers here, scott, that national association of latino officials tells us that every 30 seconds in this countr
and 47 republicans. one-third of the u.s. senate is up for election tonight. that's 33 seats. 23 democratic and ten republican. in order for the republicans to take control of the senate, they would need to win four seats. that bat logical take place in about a dozen states from places like connecticut and massachusetts out east to nevada and arizona out west. cbs news considers six of these states true tossups. that's massachusetts, connecticut, virginia, wisconsin, north dakota, and montana. republicans have what they're calling their big four. that's montana, north dakota, nebraska and wisconsin. republicans tell us in order for them to win the senate they have to win the majority of the big four. the polls have closed. we're going to take a closer look in virginia where the polls have closed at the senate race there. there's a contest between two former popular governors. you have republican george allen, the former u.s. senator from that state and democrat tim kaine, the former head of the democratic national committee. this is a very tight race. it's also the most expensive
if possible. we'll be talking to you all night long. and we have one more projection. this is in a u.s. senate race in vermont. bernie sanders the independent who caucuses with the democrats in vermont has been re-elected. before we look at some of the initial results in the senate races a word about our projections. the newshour doesn't call any race. it is our policy to report results as projected by the associated press. we'll also tell you when two television networks have called a winner in a state if the a.p. has not done so. now we'll go to geoffrey brown for more on these and other congressional matters. >> brown: thanks, gwen. i'm with, here with political editor christina bell and tony and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothenberg political report. so if we start to look at the senate, they were talking about indiana called early for mitt romney on the presidential side. stu, that is not the case in this important senate race. >> we thought it might be when we first looked back months ago. >> brown: you mean months ago. richard murdoch ended up defeating richard lugar long-time sen
that's at stake tonight. 33 u.s. senate seats, a third of the senate is up for grabs as well. 23 of those seats are currently held by democrats, 10 of them by republicans. in orr to take control of the senate, the republicans need a net gain of three or four seats, depending on who wins the presidency. here is what the associated press is project the so far this evening. in the state of delaware, that tom carper has won reelection. >> ifill: and in the state of florida, bill nelson, who actually had been running against connie mack, the son and grandson of the famous connie mack, he has also won reelection, even though connie mack had been making a late surge. >> woodruff: both of those democrats. in the state of maryland, another return this isenat ben cardin, returning for his second term. >> ifill: and in rhode island, sheldon whitehouse, a good friend of the president's, returning to the senate. >> woodruff: here we have a republican in the state of tennessee, bob corker re-elected to a second term. >> ifill: jeffrey brown will be watching the congressional races for us all n
for minority communities in the u.s.. this is hosted by the joint center for political and economic studies. is just over 50 minutes. >> good morning and welcome. thank you for being here. i am the founder and president of this organization. it is an organization that has been a strategic communications but is not partisan. i am very honored and delighted to have a terrific set of panelists to -- to offer the audience today. we have to audiences today inside the capital area in a hearing room of the foreign affairs committee. i would like to thank -- >> this is the program we just showed you. we apologize for that. we do mean to show you the event for the joint center for political and economic studies. this is the one looking at the impact of the african-american vote this year. >> battleground states. analysts will continue to look at and interpret the results for some time to come, but i was struck last night by several things. the fact that the president was able to hold onto his vote totals from 2008 in a number of key battleground areas despite much speculation that he would be hurt b
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)